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Little Explorers Learn about Spring Happenings at Audubon, Saturday, April 8

Little Explorers Learn about Spring Happenings at Audubon, Saturday, April 8

Jamestown, NY – “Coming Alive” is the theme for Audubon Community Nature Center’s (ACNC’s) Little Explorers in April.

The 10-11:30 a.m. program on Saturday, April 8, is for you and the three- to eight-year-old child(ren) in your life.

April is a month that is full of beginnings and ACNC will help you investigate the life cycles of local nature.

It is when birds return to build nests and lay eggs. Frogs and turtles emerge from muddy bottoms to bask in the sun. Plants send up shoots, and insects hatch from dormant eggs.

A lesson inside will spark curiosity about what’s happening and then you will head out on a walk with a naturalist to find evidence of the life cycles you learned about. A snack and craft will follow.  

Little Explorers is an opportunity to learn about a new nature topic on the second Saturday of each month. Some time is spent both inside and out, and a snack and a craft are always included.

Explore Nature through Literature at Audubon’s April 7 First Friday

Explore Nature through Literature at Audubon’s April 7 First Friday

Jamestown, NY – At Audubon Community Nature Center’s next First Friday Lunch Bunch Terry Mosher will present, “Let’s go Birding with Rachel Carson and Robert Frost.”

At the 11 a.m. event on April 7, Mosher will lead you on an exploration of nature through literature.

All their lives, Robert Frost and Rachel Carson studied birds. By looking closely at a few poems by Frost and a few prose passages by Carson, you will discover that a poet and a literary naturalist have much to teach you about birds.

Frost’s and Carson’s interests were never general. Particular species – their habitat preferences, migrations, breeding and feeding habits, songs and calls – fired the imaginations of these great American writers.

See Thousands of Waterfowl on Audubon April 8 Outing

See Thousands of Waterfowl on Audubon April 8 Outing

Jamestown, NY – For an exciting experience this spring, the Audubon Community Nature Center invites you to travel to Oak Orchard, New York, to see the huge waterfowl migration.

The Oak Orchard Wildlife Management area is famous for hundreds of thousands of geese, ducks and other water birds stopping to feed as they migrate. The boardwalks and towers overlook vast ponds and marshes that fill with birds.

The Saturday, April 8, adventure is the first of several trips and programs to honor Audubon Community Nature Center’s 60th anniversary.  Many ardent birders have visited Oak Orchard in hopes of seeing a rare migrant, such as a White-fronted Goose, Eurasian Widgeon, or other rare bird mixed in with the thousands of migrating waterfowl. 

The trip will be led by Don Watts, a local birder and bird bander who enthusiastically shares his knowledge and expertise with birders of all levels.

Audubon Community Nature Center Supports Regional Bird Count

Audubon Community Nature Center Supports Regional Bird Count

Jamestown, NY – You can celebrate the beginning of the spring migration season by watching birds, documenting where they are, and adding your observations to those of people throughout western New York.

Every second Sunday in April since 1939, members of the Buffalo Ornithological Society (BOS) perform a one-day census of all birds in their territory. Both experienced and novice birders participate.

Along with the Ontario Field Ornithologists, the Cattaraugus Bird Club, and the Allegheny Bird Club, the Audubon Community Nature Center is supporting this ambitious effort to count as many birds as possible on one day.

If you have experience in bird counting, you can be part of this important work by volunteering on Sunday, April 9.  If you’re interested but inexperienced, you could observe others and learn for future counts.   

Volunteer Trail Guide Training at Audubon Wednesdays in April

Volunteer Trail Guide Training at Audubon Wednesdays in April

Jamestown, NY – Question: How can Audubon Community Nature Center’s four-member education staff provide an outdoor experience for more than 3,000 schoolchildren every spring?

Answer: With the help of volunteers who have a passionate enthusiasm for sharing nature with children.

Trail Guides volunteers are essential to the education programming at Audubon. Most often these volunteers lead Discovery Walks with elementary age students visiting Audubon on a fieldtrip. Hour and a half Discovery Walks consist of a series of activities that engage the students in learning.

Audubon is offering training to provide new and returning volunteers with the skills to lead small groups on Audubon trails and become Trail Guides.

Learn About Being an Audubon Trail Guide on Wednesday, March 29

Learn About Being an Audubon Trail Guide on Wednesday, March 29

Jamestown, NY – With more than 3,000 schoolchildren visiting every spring, the Audubon Community Nature Center needs volunteers with a love of nature to lead Discovery Walks with groups of students.

“Our trail guides generously share their time and themselves for the important work of connecting children to nature,” said Audubon naturalist and volunteer coordinator Katie Finch. “These volunteers are critically important, and their impact can last a lifetime!”

At the New Trail Guide Orientation on Wednesday morning, March 29, you can find out how to become a Trail Guide volunteer and learn about this rewarding opportunity to assist the education staff with elementary school fieldtrips.

Protect Yourself From Rising Utility Rates with Solar Energy

Protect Yourself From Rising Utility Rates with Solar Energy

When’s the last time you took a long look at your electric bill? Between rising service fees and delivery fees, you’ll quickly discover one cold, hard fact: To the electric company, you’re a “rate payer,” not a valued customer.

“Like any other corporation, utility companies are bound by their investors to do everything they can to maximize profits,” said Alicia Uebelhoer, co-owner of Buffalo Solar Solutions Inc. “They are more than happy with the fact that you don’t understand what you’re paying for. And they are even happier that you don’t realize the truth.”

The truth is, that in many cases, customers of the electric utility companies are paying more for the delivery of their electricity than they are for the electricity itself.