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Kiwanis Clubs Provide Audubon Camperships; Some Camps Still Have Openings

Kiwanis Clubs Provide Audubon Camperships; Some Camps Still Have Openings

Jamestown, NY – Generous contributions from the Kiwanis Club of Jamestown and the Kiwanis Club of Warren, Inc., provided camperships to enable more children and youth to enjoy day camps at Audubon Community Nature Center this summer. 

It’s not too late for your child to have a great outdoor experience before heading back to school.

Campership donors make camp more accessible to those in financial need and provide support for the camp program overall. While not all requests can be met in full, parents and guardians may ask for assistance, and all requests are kept in the strictest confidence.

In addition to scattered openings, a few more are in each of these:

Audubon Part of July 29-30 Wild America Nature Festival at Panama Rocks

Audubon Part of July 29-30 Wild America Nature Festival at Panama Rocks

Jamestown, NY – With the opportunity to celebrate nature and all things inspired by it plus fun and activities for all ages, the staff and volunteers at Audubon Community Nature Center are looking forward to being part of the inaugural Wild America Nature Festival.

The two-day event on Saturday and Sunday, July 29 and 30, is hosted by Jamestown, New York’s Roger Tory Peterson Institute of Natural History (RTPI) and Panama Rocks Scenic Park. Panama Rocks is the amazing natural wonder where Wild America is being held in Panama, New York.

The Festival will feature wild animals, a juried fine nature art and craft show and competition, a local food cook-off competition and farmers market, and classes, workshops, music, and talks by well-known speakers and artists. It is planned to raise awareness of nature and the environment, encourage sustainable enjoyment of the environment, promote conservation of our natural world, and have fun celebrating Wild America.

Invasive Species Awareness Week Volunteers Wanted for Honeysuckle Harvest at Kenneglenn

Invasive Species Awareness Week Volunteers Wanted for Honeysuckle Harvest at Kenneglenn

In honor of Invasive Species Awareness Week, on Thursday, July 13, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Western New York Land Conservancy is partnering with the Western New York Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM) to remove Tartarian Honeysuckle from the Kenneglenn Nature Preserve in Wales. 

Tartarian Honeysuckle is an invasive shrub that was introduced to the United States from Asia. Here in Western New York, where it has no natural controls, its leaves appear early in the spring and remain into late fall, giving it a competitive advantage over native plants. The implications of an invasive plant infestation are wide reaching, from impacts to native woodland plants to insects and birds. 

Audubon Nearing the Finish Line in Wiping Out Invasive Water Chestnut

Audubon Nearing the Finish Line in Wiping Out Invasive Water Chestnut

Jamestown, NY – Hundreds of volunteers over five summers deserve credit for the Audubon Community Nature Center’s (ACNC) nearing the finish line in eradicating the European Water Chestnut that first appeared in 2013.

Audubon senior naturalist Jeff Tome reports that, “In waders and kayaks, Western New York PRISM (Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management) staff recently spent four days pulling water chestnut out of our waterways.  Thanks to their efforts coupled with the work of our great seasonal staff and local volunteers, the problem appears to be getting under control.”

Learn Beginning Bonsai at Audubon on Sunday, July 23

Learn Beginning Bonsai at Audubon on Sunday, July 23

Jamestown, NY – Are you fascinated by bonsai, the ornamental tree or shrub grown as a miniature in a container to be a piece of art?

On Sunday afternoon, July 23, you can learn to create miniature trees in the Japanese bonsai tradition at “The Art of Bonsai for Beginners” at the Audubon Community Nature Center.

From 2 to 4 p.m. Trenton Lutes will teach the history of bonsai, the specialized tools used, the most common styles, and general bonsai care -- all while you create your own bonsai tree. He will share information gathered from years of experience to instruct the beginning bonsai enthusiast in the techniques needed to turn a standard nursery stock plant into your very own bonsai tree.

Using pre-selected nursery stock you will find the front and line of the trees, use careful pruning and pinching to remove unwanted branches, leaves and needles, as well as use basic wiring techniques to help shape the trees.

Learn about the Return of Osprey on Tuesday Afternoon, July 18, at Audubon

Learn about the Return of Osprey on Tuesday Afternoon, July 18, at Audubon

Jamestown, NY – A few years ago, large nests started appearing on power line poles in Chautauqua County.

These nests belong to Ospreys, also known as Fish Hawks. The diet of these birds of prey consists almost exclusively of fish, and they nest near a body of water that provides an adequate food supply.

You can learn and experience A Fish Hawk’s Tale at Audubon Community Nature Center on Tuesday afternoon, July 18. The program will look at the life and times of this unique bird and why, after a long absence, more are now visible in this region.

Following a brief indoor session beginning at 4:30 p.m., the class will head out on the road to carpool to a local osprey nest. Participants will observe the nest with spotting scopes and binoculars to see the ospreys up close. The adventure will conclude by 6 p.m.

Audubon Community Nature Center Part of National Bird Banding Program

Audubon Community Nature Center Part of National Bird Banding Program

Jamestown, NY – Opportunities remain to observe Audubon Community Nature Center’s participation in the continent-wide MAPS bird banding program, now in its seventh year there.

You can watch Nathan Weyandt, a Fisheries Biologist Aide for the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, as he captures, bands, and releases birds, recording information for science. Remaining work dates are Saturdays, July 1, 15 and 22, and August 5, 2017.

MAPS stands for Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship. The MAPS Program is made up of mist netting stations that capture and band birds for study. The data gathered during these sessions help bird scientists understand more about longevity, breeding, and movement of bird species in our region and beyond.