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Join Audubon for Field Trip to Elk Country

Join Audubon for Field Trip to Elk Country

Jamestown, NY – As part of its Bucket List Series, the Audubon Center & Sanctuary is offering a rare opportunity: a field trip to see elk in the wild.

Elk once roamed much of North America but began to disappear from the East in the 1800s due to overhunting and habitat destruction. Reintroduction programs beginning in the early twentieth century brought wild stock from western populations back east. One strong population can be found in Benezette, Pa., about 80 miles southeast of the Audubon Center.

At 10 a.m. on Wednesday, October 1, the Audubon van will depart for Benezette to visit the beautiful Elk Country Visitor Center. The afternoon will be spent learning about these majestic animals through displays and diorama, interactive touch screen exhibits, the touch and feel Discovery Room, and the 4D story theater.

WNY Environmental Summit to Include Speaker From SolarCity

WNY Environmental Summit to Include Speaker From SolarCity

Developments over the past decade in the region’s sustainability efforts will be explored at the 10th annual Western New York Environmental Summit that will take place from 8:30 to noon Sept. 27 in the Daemen College Wick Campus Center.

“A Decade of Progress: Sustainability Comes of Age in WNY” will include a keynote address, “The Was, Is and Will Be of Solar Power,” at 9 a.m. by Ian Diamond, senior manager of commercial project development at SolarCity. The company has announced plans to build an expanded solar panel manufacturing plant in Buffalo that will be one of the biggest in the world and bring more than 1,000 jobs to the area.

“We are delighted to have Ian Diamond as keynote speaker given SolarCity’s planned investment in the RiverBend clean energy hub in South Buffalo,” said Cheryl Bird, executive director of the Daemen Center for Sustainable Communities and Civic Engagement (CSCCE).

Leaf Printing Workshop at Audubon

Leaf Printing Workshop at Audubon

Jamestown, NY – The Audubon Center & Sanctuary has the perfect opportunity for you to get your creative juices going and make some beautiful items to keep for yourself or give as gifts.

From 1:00 to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday afternoon, September 27, 2014, Audubon is presenting a Leaf Printing Workshop where participants will make two leaf monoprints, one on paper and one on a scarf.

After a brief demonstration by retired fine arts teacher Sue Yauchzy of what is meant by “leaf monoprint,” the class will head outside with naturalist Jennifer Schlick to Audubon’s Ted Grisez Arboretum, a living museum containing over 60 native trees. You will learn a bit about the Audubon grounds and the trees in this gigantic garden while you collect a few fallen leaves for your project.

Back inside, Yauchzy takes over again to lead you through the process of making two projects – one on paper, and one on a scarf made from bamboo fabric that drapes beautifully.

Learn to Make Rope from Natural Fiber at Audubon

Learn to Make Rope from Natural Fiber at Audubon

Jamestown, NY – How would you like to learn to make rope from an abundant plant found in nature?

On Saturday afternoon, September 20, Master Naturalist and living historian Chris Collins will teach you to make natural fiber cordage using native plants at the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Natural Fiber Cordage Workshop.

Using simple but time-honored techniques, from 1-2:30 p.m. Collins will demonstrate using Dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum L.), also called Indian Hemp. He will walk participants through the steps to identify the plant in the field, learn to extract the fibers from the stalk, and use those fibers to create cordage. Each participant will make approximately two feet of natural cordage.

First Call for Audubon Enchanted Forest Reservations

First Call for Audubon Enchanted Forest Reservations

Jamestown, NY – You don’t have to be a child to be charmed by human-sized animals that talk to you and tell you about their lives.

“Magical” is the best description for the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s annual Enchanted Forest. Friday and Saturday evenings, October 3 and 4, 2014, will be the ninth presentation of this event that continues to delight children and the adults – parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, friends – fortunate enough to accompany them.

The evening begins with stories and songs at a backyard campfire. Then as you follow the trail lined with luminaries, you meet animals who tell you about their habits, homes, and more. After about a 45-minute walk, you can enjoy refreshments and crafts inside the building.

Learn about Bird Research at Audubon

Learn about Bird Research at Audubon

Jamestown, NY – Hundreds of area residents as well as out-of-towners have been fascinated by the bird banding they have observed at the Audubon Center & Sanctuary.

At the next First Friday Lunch Bunch on September 5, you can learn about some of the bird-related research happening at Audubon when Terry LeBaron and Jennifer Schlick present “A Bird in the Hand.”  

At the 11 a.m. event you can see pictures and hear stories about the group of ornithologists doing research at the Riverside Road sanctuary. Starting the last Saturday in April, these bird scientists do a spring migration demonstration of bird banding. Throughout the summer, they continue banding to collect data about the birds that breed there.

Audubon also has many nest boxes on the property that are monitored by volunteers and student interns. All of these projects enable many people to see birds “up close and personal.”

Wild Edibles Workshop at Audubon

Wild Edibles Workshop at Audubon

Jamestown, NY – Learning what is safe to eat in the wild can be tasty, cost saving, fun, and even help control some invasive species!

On Wednesday evening, September 10, you can learn to identify fall fruits, greens, and nuts as well as other wild edibles at the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s “Wild Edibles” workshop.

From 6-8:30 p.m. workshop participants will discover how to recognize edible plants and distinguish them from those that may look similar.

Some people forage for survival, others to save on their grocery bill. Foraging can also be a wonderful way to spend time outside, learn plant identification, try new foods, and strengthen your connection to the earth and the food it produces to nourish our bodies. Enjoying the tasty Autumn Olive berries could even help control this invasive species.