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Audubon Mother’s Day Wildflower Walk at Bentley Preserve

Audubon Mother’s Day Wildflower Walk at Bentley Preserve

Jamestown, NY – Continuing a long-standing tradition, on Sunday afternoon, May 14, naturalist Jack Gulvin will lead the Audubon Community Nature Center’s annual Mother’s Day Wildflower Walk at the Bentley Preserve of the Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy.

Starting at 2 p.m. at the entrance to Bentley Preserve just north of Jamestown, walkers meander through the woods in search of spring wildflowers. The hike features all the spring flowers, from the white Black Cohosh to Stinking Benjamin, another name for Red Trillium.

The two-hour Mother’s Day event is an opportunity to take time to enjoy the beauty of even the smallest and most common of our wildflowers. Learn which are native and which were brought here by Europeans, eager to see a familiar sight from the home country. Also learn about some that tagged along, uninvited.   

Little Explorers Learn about Flower Power at Audubon, Saturday, May 13

Little Explorers Learn about Flower Power at Audubon, Saturday, May 13

Jamestown, NY – “Flower Power” is the theme for Audubon Community Nature Center’s next Little Explorers.

You and the three- to eight-year-old child(ren) in your life can learn about flowers and their adaptations at this 10-11:30 a.m. program on Saturday, May 13.

The world is filled with flowers in May, so you will hunt for some of them and learn, all while enjoying the outdoors. A brief lesson indoors prepares you for a hike. A snack and, time allowing, a craft follow the walk.

Plants have creative ways to reproduce, the most showy being flowers. You will investigate different flowers and how their shapes, colors, and scents help the parent plant make seeds.

Flowers come in a variety of forms, many to attract a pollinator that will help them exchange pollen with another flower to make seeds. Learn about different flower-animal partnerships, how flowers attract pollinators, and some special features that make them successful.

Erie County Parks, Land Conservancy Collaborate to Create New Natural Habitat Park Along Lakeshore

Erie County Parks, Land Conservancy Collaborate to Create New Natural Habitat Park Along Lakeshore

Last spring, a generous landowner donated a beautiful eight-acre forest on a bluff overlooking Lake Erie in Derby to the Western New York Land Conservancy. The Land Conservancy is a nonprofit land trust that protects forests, farms and scenic vistas forever; including places like the Stella Niagara Preserve in Lewiston and The Owens Falls Sanctuary in Aurora.  

There is very little natural land like this left along the Lake Erie shoreline. The forest has trees that are more than 100 years old. Many birds find food and shelter in these trees during their long spring and fall migrations. Scattered wetlands provide habitat for frogs, toads and salamanders. It will be a great place to take a walk, enjoy nature and marvel at the spectacular sunsets over Lake Erie.

Experience Terrific Turtles at Audubon, Saturday, May 13

Experience Terrific Turtles at Audubon, Saturday, May 13

Jamestown, NY – Ever wonder what a turtle’s shell is really called? Or why they stick their heads inside? Why some turtles live on land and others live in water? And what turtles we have in our area?

For answers to your questions, come to the Audubon Community Nature Center between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 13, for Terrific Turtles.

In an open house style, meet turtles, pet some, and learn some of the facts and folklore surrounding these reptiles.

At least ten turtle species call this region home. You can learn more about each species as well as other non-native turtles.

You can touch some of the turtles and find out why others are protected. Learn how to create turtle-friendly habitat in your yard and what to do if you find a turtle crossing the road.

There will also be crafts, artifacts, and games.

For an additional $3, Scouts -- and anyone who wants to join the fun -- can earn a Terrific Turtles fun patch.

Audubon Opportunity Friday, May 12: Witness the Unusual Woodcocks

Audubon Opportunity Friday, May 12: Witness the Unusual Woodcocks

Jamestown, NY – It’s spring and time to think about finding a mate, at least if you are a woodcock! 

These bizarre looking birds attract mates every spring by making incredible whistling flights hundreds of feet up into the air above local fields, at dusk and at dawn.

You can learn about and observe the American Woodcock on Friday evening, May 12, in a Woodcock Walk presented by the Audubon Community Nature Center. The event will begin in the Warren County Conservation District at the corner of Hatch Run Road and Conewango Avenue in Warren.

At 7:30 p.m., a short presentation will showcase the unusual habits of American Woodcocks and their spring mating flights. Afterward, the group will travel to the Hatch Run Conservation Area to look for woodcocks.

Audubon Presents Birdsong Walk at Fredonia’s College Lodge

Audubon Presents Birdsong Walk at Fredonia’s College Lodge

Jamestown, NY – Have you ever listened to a bird sing and wondered if you were hearing a robin or a cardinal or some kind of finch?

On Wednesday morning, May 10, you can get answers to your birdsong questions when Audubon Community Nature Center presents a Birdsong Walk and Workshop at the SUNY Fredonia College Lodge in Brocton, New York.

Beginning at 8:30 a.m., in an informal, half-hour workshop, Terry Mosher will teach you to identify about 15 birds by song. Then you’ll walk two or three trails in the lovely College Lodge woods, listening for the songs you just learned, as well as others. There will be a friendly identification competition and a prize.

The event is planned to conclude at 10:30 a.m. In the event of rain, it will be rescheduled for Friday, May 12.

Shining Light on Top Five Myths About Solar Energy

Shining Light on Top Five Myths About Solar Energy

In Western New York and across the entire U.S., home solar installations are on the rise! In 2012, homeowners installed enough residential solar panels to power the equivalent of almost 24,000 homes.

Despite its growing popularity, solar technology remains unfamiliar to many Americans. As renewable energy becomes a mainstay topic for the nation's partisan political debates, consumers may struggle to separate the facts about solar energy from common misconceptions.

Here are the realities behind five common solar myths, courtesy of Buffalo Solar Solutions Inc. and SolarWorld Americas: