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Labor Day Weekend Treat: Audubon’s Monarch Butterfly Festival

Labor Day Weekend Treat: Audubon’s Monarch Butterfly Festival

Jamestown, NY – Volunteers have spent much of the summer raising Monarch Butterflies for the Jamestown (NY) Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Monarch Butterfly Festival on Saturday, August 30.

“It’s a challenge to provide Monarchs for this wonderful event,” said Audubon Senior Naturalist and Festival Coordinator Jeff Tome. “With the Monarchs’ very existence being threatened, part of the purpose of the festival it to encourage a nourishing environment for these lovely creatures.”

The 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Labor Day weekend experience is one for which you want to be sure to bring your camera.

Leadership of Audubon and RTPI Explore Future Collaborations

Leadership of Audubon and RTPI Explore Future Collaborations

Jamestown, NY – Two area non-profit organizations with a history of cooperation, common goals and a shared linkage to Jamestown’s famous naturalist, Roger Tory Peterson, have begun exploratory conversations about expanded collaborations. A task force comprised of board leadership and the presidents of the Jamestown Audubon Society (JAS) and the Roger Tory Peterson Institute of Natural History (RTPI) have met to assess the desirability and feasibility of new program collaborations and the potential for consolidation of some administrative functions.

Enjoy “Monarchs & Margaritas” at Audubon

Enjoy “Monarchs & Margaritas” at Audubon

Jamestown, NY – You can enjoy live butterflies, music, food, games, and margaritas at the first-ever “Monarchs & Margaritas” presented by the Audubon Center & Sanctuary.

From 5-7 p.m. on Friday, August 29, you are invited to support the Monarch Butterflies as they prepare for their migration to Mexico.

Audubon will be a flurry of activity preparing for the next day’s Monarch Butterfly Festival as the staff creates in indoor butterfly house full of beautiful flowers and Monarch Butterflies. For the first time, Audubon is opening up for an exclusive sneak peak the night before.

Monarchs need help. Throughout the last decade, their populations have been decimated by habitat loss, deforestation, and drought. Through a fun game and the opportunity to view all stages of the Monarch life cycle up close, you will learn more about their plight and how you can help.

Third Healthy Landscapes, Healthy Waters Presentation on August 14

Third Healthy Landscapes, Healthy Waters Presentation on August 14

Jamestown, NY – You can take actions that will improve the health of our local waterways.

On Thursday, August 14, 7-8 p.m., Jamestown Audubon, the Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy, and the Chautauqua Lake Association are presenting the third in their summer series “Healthy Landscapes, Healthy Waters.”

Scott Kischbaugh of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation will discuss the condition of the nation’s lakes along with more details about the lakes of New York State. When he talks about “Reducing the Likelihood of Algal Blooms by Doing the Little Things,” Kischbaugh will emphasize how the small actions of individuals -- buffer strip installations, septic tank maintenance, invasive species control and more -- can promote healthier conditions in the nearby waters.

The event will be in the main lecture hall in Building A at the BOCES Hewes Educational Center on West Lake Road (Route 394) in Ashville.

Put Audubon Butterfly Festival on Your Calendar Now

Put Audubon Butterfly Festival on Your Calendar Now

Jamestown, NY – For a memorable grand finale to your summer, plan to participate in the Jamestown (NY) Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Monarch Butterfly Festival.

On August 30, the Saturday of Labor Day Weekend, Audubon will create an indoor garden of wildflowers with butterflies winging about. 

From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. visitors will be fascinated by Monarchs in every stage of their life cycle, from tiny eggs through the caterpillar, chrysalis, and beautiful butterflies. You can hold a caterpillar and watch experts tagging butterflies. At 4 p.m. you can see them released to fly to Mexico, where their tags will help scientists track the migration of this rapidly dwindling species. And bring your camera!

Audubon Leading “Meet Me at the Riverwalk”

Audubon Leading “Meet Me at the Riverwalk”

Jamestown, NY – Beavers, swallows and warblers in downtown Jamestown?

On Saturday evening, August 16, you can meet an Audubon Center & Sanctuary naturalist to walk the Riverwalk and discover the plants and animals that call Jamestown “home.”

You will be amazed at what lives in the city. Despite concrete, pavement and 30,000 people, nature still has a foothold. Residents have seen beavers gathering sticks and ducks nesting, and heard warblers singing along the Riverwalk.

The Riverwalk starts behind Brooklyn Square -- at the northwest corner of South Main and Harrison Streets -- and runs along the Chadakoin River to Panzarella Point behind the Jamestown Board of Public Utilities. Walking with Audubon Naturalist Corinne Fredrickson, you will appreciate one of Jamestown’s most unique locations by observing the plants, birds, insects, reptiles, and mammals that are using or living along the Chadakoin River.

At Audubon: Learn About Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes

At Audubon: Learn About Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes

Jamestown, NY – Grasses are the most economically important crop in modern times, providing building materials and fuel, as well as food for both humans and other animals.

On Saturday, August 16, 2014, at the Audubon Center & Sanctuary’s Grasses, Sedges and Rushes workshop you can learn to distinguish these kinds of plants and the importance of each as they provide critical habitat for a number of wildlife

During the 1-3 p.m. class, Instructor Elyse Henshaw will teach several handy tricks for telling the difference between the three and even to identify characteristics of specific species.

Grasses, sedges and rushes each grow in specific conditions and make up important habitats for a number of grassland and wetland species. From Henslow’s Sparrows to muskrats, a number of species rely on grasses, sedges and rushes for foraging, nesting and protection from predators.