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Little Explorers Learn about Nighttime Animals at Audubon, Saturday, August 12

Little Explorers Learn about Nighttime Animals at Audubon, Saturday, August 12

Jamestown, NY – “Shh…look…listen…to the sounds of the dark say Goodnight!”

These words of Richard Jackson from his book All Ears All Eyes set the stage for Audubon Community Nature Center’s next Little Explorers.

You and the three- to eight-year-old child(ren) in your life can learn about nighttime animals and their senses on Saturday, August 12, at this 10-11:30 a.m. program.

A brief lesson inside will be about the nighttime world. Then the group will go outdoors to look for signs of the animals not seen during the day, before returning inside for a snack and, if time allows, a craft.

Night ushers in a whole new world. A chirp and a swoosh and a chatter and a hoot. These are the sounds that fill the night woods and fields. Who makes them? Who hears them? What do they mean?

Animals that are active at night have to use their ears so much more than their eyes, as well as their sense of smell and touch.

Make a Beautiful Beaded Bracelet at Audubon Saturday Afternoon, August 12

Make a Beautiful Beaded Bracelet at Audubon Saturday Afternoon, August 12

Jamestown, NY – Artist Anne Jackson has been teaching beading for more than 20 years.

On Saturday afternoon, August 12, she can teach you how to create a beaded owl and attach it to a fun, colorful, bracelet.

At the 1-3 p.m. workshop you will learn how to use the brick stitch to bead the small owl, then fasten it to a memory wire bracelet you create with larger beads.

Whether you choose to keep your nature-themed jewelry or give it as a gift, you will be delighted with your work. You will also receive full print instructions so you make more at home.

Be sure to bring your glasses if you need them for close-up work.

Jackson is a member of the Chautauqua County Society of Artists. She has taught beading for more than two decades, both privately as well as at Audubon and other venues.

Local Educator Discovers How to Unleash Children's Love for Nature ​

Local Educator Discovers How to Unleash Children's Love for Nature ​

Like many of us with a few years under our belt, Dave Bauer grew up in an era before video games and cellphones, when children enthusiastically played in the great outdoors until the streetlights went on. He thoroughly enjoyed exploring his natural surroundings, leaving no stone unturned and being completely intrigued by the creepy crawlers found in the soil beneath. 

Bauer’s youthful appreciation of nature led to a successful career as a teacher of environmental science and training others in creative thinking, change leadership and living sustainability. Following his retirement from the teaching profession, he turned his attention to several projects focused on reconnecting today’s youth with nature.

Saturday, August 5, is Last Chance to Observe Audubon Bird Banding

Saturday, August 5, is Last Chance to Observe Audubon Bird Banding

Jamestown, NY – Bird banding is a frequent activity at Audubon Community Nature Center.

This age-old technique used to discover details about the behaviors of birds is scheduled in the spring to add to the general knowledge about local birds. In the summer, the work is part of the continent-wide MAPS bird banding program.

Saturday morning, August 5, is the last opportunity to watch Nathan Weyandt as he captures, bands, and releases birds, recording information for science. Weyandt is a Fisheries Biologist Aide for the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission,

As the research requires opening the nets at dawn and monitoring birds for six hours, the hours are roughly between 6 a.m. and noon.

Audubon Benefits in Many Ways from Stephanie Frucella Memorial Fund

Audubon Benefits in Many Ways from Stephanie Frucella Memorial Fund

Jamestown, NY – When Jamestown residents Bob and Kathleen Frucella lost their daughter, a fourth grade teacher, they established a fund at Audubon Community Nature Center in her memory.

Since 2009, young people have earned their way to Summer Day Camps at Audubon Community Nature Center by receiving the Stephanie Frucella Memorial “Making A Difference” Scholarships.

As a child, Stephanie loved to come to the Audubon with her family to walk the trails and discover wildlife, flowers, and the beauty of nature. In her life, Stephanie strived daily to make a difference in the lives of her students and her community. Through this fund, her legacy continues.

Preference for the merit-based scholarship is given to campers in grades five and up who have demonstrated interest in volunteering, giving back to their communities, mentoring others, or who wish to start volunteering as a counselor in training or junior counselor for Day Camps.

Audubon Community Nature Center Seeking Seasonal Naturalist to Begin October 2

Audubon Community Nature Center Seeking Seasonal Naturalist to Begin October 2

Jamestown, NY – Securing a position as a seasonal naturalist at Audubon Community Nature Center is an opportunity to earn money and have fun while getting some great experience.

Friday, September 1, 2017, is the deadline for applications for the winter seasonal naturalist position that will have varying hours from October 2 through March 30.

Training and observation opportunities will be provided for the seasonal naturalist’s primary responsibility of teaching classroom nature programs to Pre-K through grade 5. Other possible tasks include leading guided nature walks with students and assisting with special events such as Enchanted Forest, Thanksgiving with the Birds, Christmas with the Critters, Doors Open Jamestown, Snowflake Local Living Festival, and others.

Visit Greystone Nature Preserve for Audubon’s August 4 First Friday

Visit Greystone Nature Preserve for Audubon’s August 4 First Friday

Jamestown, NY – Audubon Community Nature Center’s First Friday on August 4 features an exploration of Greystone Nature Preserve’s Bat Bird and Butterfly Sanctuary.

At the 11 a.m. event, bat biologist Jonathan Townsend will discuss the importance of conservation efforts on bats and birds, as well as the effects that habitat preservation can have on our native pollinating insects and other wildlife.

You can also experience the meadows and recent installation of a native medicinal plants trail at Greystone.

Townsend has had a strong interest in bat biology and conservation since a very young age. He holds a BS in Environmental Science and an MS in Biology, both from SUNY Fredonia. Currently he works as the Conservation Lands Manager at the Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy, an Adjunct Instructor in the Biology Department at Jamestown Community College, and is a Board Director at Greystone Nature Preserve.